Honor Roll - DSC Citations

Private Sampson J Stephens, 34946539, Company "C", 275th Infantry Regiment, 70th Infantry Division, United States Army. For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy. On 22 February 1945, the enemy counterattacked positions held by Private Stephensí company. When an assaulting tank threatened to break through, Private Stephens, with complete disregard for his own safety advanced alone through intense fire, armed only with a rocket launcher. Although under direct enemy observation he obtained a position within 15 yards of the tank and put it out of action with one round of fire. Private Stephens fought on with characteristic aggressiveness with his unit until he was killed by enemy fire on 25 February 1945. The courage displayed and his loyal devotion to duty are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service.

Source: GO 100, Hq. Third Army 11 May 45. Posthumous award.

Second Lieutenant CLAUDE J HAFNER, 0554721, Infantry, Company "E" 276th Infantry Regiment, 70th Infantry Division, United States Army. For extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy. On the night of 6 February 1945 Lieutenant HAFNER'S Company was pinned down by intense machine-gun, rifle and grenade fire during an attack near OETINGEN, FRANCE. Armed with a rocket launcher Lieutenant HAFNER fearlessly led two men against the enemy positions and forced the surrender of three Germans in the nearest emplacement. He then moved a squad forward and cleared two connecting dugouts, taking six more prisoners. At daylight he again distinguished himself by leading four men against by-passed positions, killing one of the defenders, bayoneting another and capturing seven prisoners. Lieutenant HAFNER'S heroic leadership and his inspiring, courageous devotion to duty exemplify the highest traditions of the military service.

Source: Source: GO 100, Hq. Third Army 11 May 45.

EDWARD R. CROWSON, 0 553 665, First Lieutenant, Infantry, Company "K" 274th Infantry Regiment, for extraordinary heroism in action. On 4 March 1945, during the attack on Stiring-Wendel, France, Lieutenant Crowson assumed command of Company "K" when his Company Commander was wounded. Under heavy enemy artillery and mortar fire he moved erect among his men shouting and encouraging them to follow him in a charge against enemy-held houses. Inspired by his leadership, the men charged and overwhelmed the enemy positions. Lieutenant Crowson was wounded by an enemy sniper, but he continued to lead the attack until late in the evening. Ordered to be evacuated, he refused, staying with his company until he had it reorganized and ready to continue the attack. Entered military service from Fayetteville, North Carolina.

Source: GO 318 Seventh Army 16 July 1945.

RICE E. CRAIN, 39 468 456, Sergeant, Infantry, Company "K", 275th Infantry Regiment, for extraordinary heroism in action on 22-23 February 1945, in the Pfaffenwald Forest, France. During an attack, his company was pinned down by a heavy enemy artillery barrage and small arms fire. When two approaching enemy tanks seriously threatened the company's right flank, Sergeant Crain, under direct enemy fare, moved to a vantage point from which he fearlessly fired two well placed bazooka shells and forced the tanks to withdraw. On the following day, when his company was harassed by sniper fire, he heroically exposed himself to observe enemy fire and personally eliminated eleven snipers. When he had almost completely wiped out the harassing element, Sergeant Crain was mortally wounded by the fire of one of. the few survivors of his heroic attach. Next of kin: Mr. Richard M Crain (Father), Box 213, Salmon, Idaho.

Source: GO 362 Seventh Army 3 August 1945. Posthumous award.

RAYMOND E. ADAMS, 18 200 396, Staff Sergeant (then Sergeant), Infantry, Company "F", 274th Infantry Regiment, for extraordinary heroism in action on 25 February 1945, at Spicheren Heights, France. After taking strategic high ground, Sergeant Adams' squad, occupying the platoon's forward position, was subjected to machine gun fire which supported a two-company enemy counterattack. Sergeant Adams immediately crossed fifty yards of open terrain, firing and maneuvering as he advanced. Throwing a hand grenade into the machine gun position, he charged with fixed bayonet, killing the three-man crew. Quickly turning the captured gun on the advancing troops, he inflicted many casualties and disorganized the attack, After expending all ammunition, he destroyed the gun and led his squad against the enemy. His courageous action enabled his platoon to break the counterattack and hold its vital objective. Entered military service from Rock Springs, Texas.

Source: GO 438 Seventh Army 25 August 1945.

GERALD E. SOPER, 37 550 610, Private First Class, Infantry, Company "F", 274th Infantry Regiment, for extraordinary heroism in action on 7 January 1945, at Wingen, France. During a daylight attack on the town, intense sniper fire and automatic weapons activity halted the advance of Private First Class Soperís platoon. Disregarding the danger, he voluntarily crawled to a basement window from which the enemy was firing and hurled a grenade inside. Moving away from the window he was wounded. He then crawled back and tossed another grenade through the opening. He was firing his rifle into the basement when hit the second time and died shortly afterwards. Private First Class Soperís gallant actions and ability enabled his platoon to resume the attack and aid in the capture of the town. Next of kin: William H. Soper (brother), 4613 Encinea Drive, Canada, California.

Source: GO 445, Seventh Army, 27 Aug 1945. Posthumous award.

JOHN W. CATHEY, 20 832 098, Staff Sergeant, Infantry, Company "L", 274th Infantry Regiment, for extraordinary heroism in action on 6 March 1945, near Styring Wendel, France. During an attack on a heavily fortified emplacement Sergeant Cathey voluntarily rode the back of a tank into battle. He directed fire and pointed out targets until a seven-foot wall halted the advance of the company. Repeatedly exposing himself, he brought rifle fire on the enemy, knocking out a machine gun nest, wounding several of the enemy and killing four. He then moved through a shell hole in a wall and rushed the enemy positions, calling for his squad to follow. After advancing thirty feet, he was severely wounded by rocket fire. His intrepid action and courage under fire led to the success of the attacking troops. Entered military service from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Source: GO 480, Seventh Army, 7 September 1945.

RONDALL H. GLAZE, 44 036 390, Private, Infantry, Company "A" 275th Infantry Regiment, for extraordinary heroism in action on 17 February 1945, near Lixing, France. During a company attack, murderous enemy machine gun fire halted the advance. Realizing the extreme gravity of the situation, Private Glaze voluntarily assumed the task of knocking out the hostile weapon. He crept across open terrain, while exposed to heavy enemy mortar, artillery, and rifle fire, and hurled a grenade .at the machine gun crew, killing them instantly. Though fatally wounded, his courageous action enabled his company to continue its advance and gain its objective. His valiant service reflects the finest traditions of the armed forces. Next of Kin: Nezzie H. Glaze (Mother) Route 1, Cleveland, Georgia. Click here for more.

Source GO 452, Seventh Army, 29 August 1945. Posthumous award.

SAMUEL G. CONLEY, 015 707, Colonel, Infantry, 274th Infantry Regiment, for extraordinary heroism in action on 19 February 1945, near Saarbrucken, Germany. During a bitter battle for the Siegfried Line defenses, atop the strategically Important Kreutzberg Ridge, Colonel Conley maneuvered under intense artillery barrages to within thirty yards of enemy entrenchments. Miraculously eluding hostile machine-gun and mortar fire for a sustained period, he dashed across the front lines, recruiting a tank and twenty-two infantrymen for an assault on the enemy. He then led a charge over barbed-wire entanglements into the German-held trenches, capturing the position and twenty-six prisoners. Colonel Conley's courageous action and superb leadership were in keeping with the highest ideals of the infantry and reflect great credit upon himself and the armed forces. Entered United States Military Academy from Van Vert, Ohio.

Source: GO 496 Seventh Army, 10 Sept 1945.

HOWARD L. ARNEST, 0 455 092, First Lieutenant, Infantry, 276th Infantry Regiment, for extraordinary heroism in action on 11 January 1945, near Obermunthal, France. With the mission of taking a hill held by a bitterly resisting enemy, Lieutenant Arnest led a day-light attack and seized the enemy's forward defensive positions. Continuing the attack despite heavy casualties, he inspired his men as they closed with the enemy in hand to hand combat. Seriously wounded when the enemy brought artillery fire on the positions, Lieutenant Arnest ordered a withdrawal, but refused to withdraw himself. He remained behind to cover his men until taken prisoner. Entered military service from Cottage Grove, Oregon.

Source: GO 579, Seventh Army, 4 October 1945

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Campaign Credits - Medal Identification