Press Dispatches
Digest of News Dispatches dated 7 March 1945

R E S T R I C T E D

HEADQUARTERS 6TH ARMY GROUP
Public Relations Section
Forward Press Camp
A.P.O. 23, U.S. ARMY

                                                                                               7 March 1945

DIGEST OF NEWS DISPATCHES FILED HERE DURING 24 HOUR PERIOD ENDING NOON TODAY


SUBJECTS:

1. Operations
2. Allied P.O.W.'s Liberated
3. M.R.S.
4. Port of Marseilles

TYPICAL DISPATCHES:

HAWKINS, ASSOCIATED PRESS: "Fierce fighting continued throughout the night in BOIS DE LA RESERVE just west of FORBACH where 70th Division's 276th Regiment slowly overcame stubborn resistance from the Germans dug in strongpoints. There were no major changes in the lines here or elsewhere along the front as both sides patrolled actively. Germans threw harrassing mortar fire into the eastern outskirts of STRASBOURG and it is disclosed that two strong enemy patrols repulsed Sunday near NIFFER in the MULHOUSE sector."

VERMILLION, UNITED PRESS: "More than 1000 dirty disesased crippled soldiers who ran and hobbled and marched fromprison hell camp of STYRING-WENDEL yesterday morning babbled thanks to Americans today in six languages. Eight hundred RUssian soldiers twenty-five Frenchmen twenty Poles one hundred and forty Jugoslavs one hundred Italians were tasting nourishment and freedom, some for the first time since captured in German invasion of Poland in 1939. All these captured soldiers were so sick and crippled to be of no use to the Germans. Six hundred have tuberculosis, four have typhus, and four are insane. Some so ill they died a few hours after liberation. Picture 1 Picture 2

OAKSHOTT, REUTERS: "The prisoners were liberated when Seventh Army troops pounded their way into STYRING-WENDEL outside SAARBRUCKEN and the guards abandoned their hospital patients and the rest of the prisoners. Practically all of them were suffering from malnutrition, wounds, disease, and infections. They were dressed in various uniforms and few were warmly clad while others were in ragged nondescipt clothing their feet in clumsy wooden shoes. An advance from the camp infiltrated into 70th Division lines on Sunday last bringing word of the prison and of the hopes of those they left behind. A number were shot as they attempted to escape but as the hard pressed Germans pulled out of the town the following day the prison guards went with them leaving the men behind.

VERMILLION, UNITED PRESS: "They ran from the camp in all directions. Some into the woods but most just took the road leading towards us. They tried to form a column of fours and march into our lines like soldiers. But it was pitiful. Some were one legged. Others too sick to walk while others collapsed during the march. We hadn't much transport but jeeps picked up some while our medics helped others and prisoners helped one another. These were the most miserable men I'd ever seen - in appearance - but also the happiest. They smiled, laughed, cried. As they walked past me each man saluted snappily as he could. One Russian with just a stump of an arm left jerked it up in military gesture and grinned at me. They crowded into the enclosure and G.I.'s gathered around and handed them cigarettes."

Webmaster Note: The report had other dispatches concerning other divisions. These have been left off. The report was submitted by Field Press Censors of the 6th Army Group Press Camps.

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